November 2006

The Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies invited George Galloway MP to take a seminar on “The World at War” but the MP was met by criticism both inside and outside the venue.

The visit has caused anger among many Campus groups. A peaceful but vociferous protest took place as Galloway entered the Law And Social Scieneces Building, which was jointly organised by Conservative Future, Labour Students, LGBT and JSoc.

Mustapha Muhammed has been disqualified from the NUS Delegate election, which took place earlier this month. It had been accused that a supporter had interfered with people votes, whilst they were logged into The Portal in computer rooms on campus.

Nearly 700 cannabis plants have been seized by Nottingham Police after raids in Sherwood, Chilwell and Heathfield.

The discovery was made by the landlady of the three properties, who was collecting rent. Police found the houses had been converted into cannabis factories, where special lighting and water systems had been set up.

Three wards in the QMC had to be closed lastnight as evidence of the superbug clostrum difficile was found in several patients. Priorities have been taken to ensure minimum risk of contamination of the bug, which is thought to have been a contributing factor in the death of an 81 year old patient. News of the bug,which is easily spread through coming into contact with infected patients, has sparked fears for the welfare of students who spend all day at the QMC medical campus. URN voiced these concerns to a hospital representative who issued this statement:

Students will finally be receiving feedback on their exams after a long campaign to the University Teaching Committee.

Its taken lots of campaigning from education officers, course reps and academic board reps but guidelines have finally been given to the schools as follows:

Imagine the symptoms of flu- the almost unbearable sensitivity, the fluctuations from hot to cold and disorientation- only imagine a version which is somehow exquisite to experience. You now have an approximation of the contradictory mood which grips the audience of Flu Season, as paradoxical a pleasure as you could ever have the good fortune to be intrigued by.

Imagine the symptoms of flu – the almost unbearable sensitivity, the fluctuations from hot to cold, the disorientation – only imagine a version which is somehow exquisite to experience. You now have an approximation of the contradictory mood which grips the audience of Flu Season, as paradoxical a pleasure as you could ever have the good fortune to be intrigued by.

Imagine the symptoms of flu- the almost unbearable sensitivity, the fluctuations from hot to cold and disorientation- only imagine a version which is somehow exquisite to experience. You now have an approximation of the contradictory mood which grips the audience of ‘Flu Season’, as paradoxical a pleasure as you could ever have the good fortune to be intrigued by.

Soap characters have been blamed for a lack of ambition in today’s youth. A learning skills council has said programme makers need to show young soap stars in a more realistic light.

Teenage characters in soap opera’s such as Eastenders and Coronation Street are often stuck in dead-end jobs which do little to inspire yound viewers. The director of the Young Peoples’ Learning and Skills Council feels that if soap characters remain in dead-end jobs there is a danger that young people will accept this as the norm. Consequently she has urged characters moving up in life. For example Eastenders star Stacey slater, a market stall holder could be shown as a buyer.

A report for the Vice-Chancellors’ group, Universities UK, has today claimed that degrees, previously known for their less academic studies, are in fact vital to the UK economy.

The wide range of degree courses available means that the UK has “a workforce with diverse and specific skills”, said Universities UK’s president, Professor Drummond Bone.