Standing in the queue at Sainsbury’s, ready to hand over almost £4 for yet another magazine, I wondered to myself why I bother. A skint student, I really should be attempting to save money, and yet here I was, ready to throw it away on something that I didn’t really need. Not because I don’t think fashion is important, but because I already knew what lay between those glossy covers, and didn’t have to pay extortionate amounts for the privilege, through the vast amounts of immediately available content on the Internet.

In an age where all magazines have their own websites, with the majority of articles taken from print and replicated online, why would anyone need to purchase the printed version? Admittedly, you have to wait to view the more recent articles and interviews online, and by then the articles may be slightly outdated. However, this is arguably true of the magazines themselves. By the time that the articles have been written, edited, designed and printed it’s a fairly level playing field between the two mediums.

Nobody involved in the fashion industry could have predicted the influence that fashion bloggers could have had. The blogging platform has enabled amateur fashion journalists to publish through non-traditional means and for some to gain an impressive fan base. It has also allowed for unique talent, which would have struggled in mainstream fashion journalism. Testament to this was the guest list at London Fashion Week, with 33% of tickets being allocated to bloggers.

So, are magazines outdated and am I therefore wasting my money? Well, yes and no. While those who want to be kept up to date with fashion events and trends can do so easily online, and with more diversity of opinions and a greater scope of information, nothing to me beats a tangible glossy.

The shiny pages and opulent editorials appear that bit more vivid than when staring back at me from the screen of my laptop. Its also clear that time has been invested into the page design, with the design of some fashion mags as stunning as the clothing showcased.

I’m willing to admit that it’s materialism at its most blatant, but who doesn’t like to indulge a little every now and then?

Tessa Sampson

Previous post

The Tragedy of Cambodian History

Next post

Annual open 2010 @ Nottingham Castle

1 Comment

  1. Milly Hooper
    March 12, 2010 at 19:47 — Reply

    I think this is a really interesting article and something that has begun to be a key question with the rise of bloggers etc. This is a much more interesting viewpoint than some I’ve read though, much better than just stating facts and figures etc.

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.