9th-16th February. 300 shows.

The Clothes

Mouth-watering and tummy tingling, New York Fashion Week did not disappoint, with its extensive, exciting and exquisite shower of clothes. There was a definite nod to “urban utility”, with a host of designers including, Alexander Wang, DKNY and Proenza Schouler showcasing utilitarian clothing, balancing what is practical and wearable, yet maintaining a chic sophistication and edge. A host of dark, bold colours such as peroxide, olive green and oxblood amalgamated with rich textures, strong patterns and embellishment which allowed designers to really set hearts racing with mature clothing that really popped and screamed exclusive.

Dresses, dresses and more dresses! Every pattern and texture imaginable appeared to have been at the forefront of every designer’s imagination for the up-and-coming season. Marc Jacobs continued to excel himself as usual with another range of feminine and flirty dresses, which has become something of a trademark for him. Alongside that, there was an influx of cosy, warm and comfortable clothing, such as blanket coats and structural outerwear; a salute to the bitter weather which has been gracing our days as of late. The Marc Jacobs show was the hottest ticket in town. He transformed his runway into a yellow brick road, with a magical yet eerie paper cut-out set.  The show stood out from a lot of ‘samey runway’ sets, Marc Jacobs managed to capture fairytale, tasteful tailoring and sports luxe in one swoop.

It simply wouldn’t be Fashion Week without a spot of glamour for the sake of glamour. Marchesa, Michael Kors and Ralph Lauren did what they do best and what other designers often struggle to compete with. Stop in time, head turning, standout evening wear which oozed romance and enchantment. The shimmering fabrics and sheer silhouettes were truly an exquisite sight to behold. We are sure that these designs will be featured on the red carpet in no time.

The Faces

The young and the beautiful are to Fashion Week what Kate Moss is to the cover of British Vogue, ever-present and always a perfect association. New York Fashion Week 2012 was no exception, with a host of famous faces, as well as the up-and-coming. Drawn to the bright lights and box-fresh creations which glide before them, the exclusivity of the front rows saw Rooney Mara, Jessica Alba and Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, amongst many others. It was Maria Sharapova, no stranger to fashion herself and Victor Cruz, the New York Giant and symbol of all things American, who cut the ribbon to mark the beginning of Fashion Week.

 

However, it wasn’t just the celebrities or even the shows themselves which were receiving all of the attention. Due to the colossal surge in street style and fashion blog interest, anyone who caught the lens of a camera, attending a show or simply passing by, was deemed worthy of a photograph. Welcome to the new age of fashion.

The Headline

Despite the unstoppable pace of fashion week, a moment was taken by all to remember Zelda Kaplan, a New York Socialite and bona fide party animal who sadly passed away whilst watching the Joanna Mastroianni show in the front row. However, it will not only be sorrow which fills the hearts and minds of her many mourners, but admiration and a profound fondness. At the age of 95, it cannot be disputed that Kaplan had lived a long and fabulous life. A constant figure on the arts scene and consistently clad in outlandish, distinctive clothing, Zelda Kaplan will be sorely missed by all who knew the face behind those trademark sunglasses, and even those who never met her.

Abby Robinson

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  1. […] NY Trend Week 2012 Mouth-watering and tummy tingling, New York Style Week did not disappoint, with its extensive, exciting and beautiful shower of outfits. There was a definite nod to “urban utility”, with a host of designers like, Alexander Wang, DKNY and Proenza … Examine far more on Affect Journal […]

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