There are a lot of excited rumbles in Nottingham’s music scene about Jake Bugg. The young Clifton-based musician has played guitar since the age of 12 and has developed over the last six years into the East Midlands’ very own Bob Dylan. It is very clichéd to put such prestigious comparisons on such fledgling musicians; however I dare anyone to listen to more than half a minute of any of his songs and not see the similarity.

It is clear from the moment that his unique voice combines with the rootsy guitar on ‘Country Song’ or ‘Trouble Town’ that this young man from the heart of Nottingham is channelling Dylan’s sound. There are more comparisons between the two: Dylan was also a raw young talent before releasing his eponymous debut album. However Jake Bugg is even younger than Dylan was when breaking onto the musical scene and Jake’s songs already have more subtlety and nuance than Dylan’s early song writing.

The excitement about Jake Bugg comes from a city that has had to enviously watch neighbours Sheffield produce Pulp, The Arctic Monkeys, and The Human League, whilst never producing anyone notable of its own. However there is now genuine optimism that Bugg could become the first ever Nottingham-based No. 1 musician in the next few weeks. His debut album ‘Jake Bugg’ will be released on October 15th, off the back of national hype stretching back to Glastonbury 2011. Since then it has been a roller coaster of a ride: ‘Jake Bugg’ was trending worldwide on Twitter after his performance on Jools Holland earlier this year; he has also recently supported Noel Gallagher and The Stone Roses. A particular area of pride for Bugg must be that his recent single ‘Lightning Bolt’ has been adopted by sprinter Usain Bolt as his theme song and was played in the Olympic Stadium before the 100m final this summer.

Add all of this to an EP of just four tracks reaching the iTunes top 5 recently and it is clear why everyone is starting to get very excited by Jake Bugg’s upcoming debut album. He has already sold out a massive homecoming show at Nottingham Rescue Rooms in November. With the way the seeds have been sowed, it could prove to be a very special homecoming for a very special talent, who could finally be the man to put Nottingham on the musical map of the world.
Liam Coleman

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