Hardcore-punk is one of those cult genres which is difficult to popularize. When Gallows got signed to Warner Brothers in 2007 their first release on the label, Grey Britain, resulted in them immediately being dropped. Whilst music fans will give a nod to legends like Black Flag and Minor Threat, the majority of us look with a mixture of confusion and fascination at the dedicated hardcore-kids of the country.

For a while now TRC have been one of the UK’s finest hardcore acts and have developed a strong underground following. They have always been progressive; blending the unlikely genres of grime and hardcore-punk. Yet 2012 has seen the development go further: releases have been more produced; the band is targeting America; and they have tried starting a twitter trend through the hashtag ‘TeamUK’. Are TRC really still hardcore?

The band were recently in Rock City’s Basement: a small, dark venue scattered with about thirty angry looking teenagers. It is the sort of gig you would expect them to be playing a few years ago, but it is a stark contrast to their recent ‘synthesised albums’ and ‘#TeamUK’ twitter trends.

From the start to finish of the gig the crowd were yelling the band’s lyrics, creating a unified voice louder than you get at most gigs (certainly a louder noise than 30 skinny teenagers should be able to make). Fans were manically jumping to scream into the microphone and the entire floor was a constant, savage mess of hardcore-dancing.

The energy of the fans and the band was phenomenal and it was without a doubt a great gig, but a great hardcore gig. Progression is always good, but if TRC keep trying to push themselves away from hardcore music, they could collapse a house of cards which they seem to quite comfortably be standing on.

Ian Fillingham

…Ian has been listening to Paul Simon – The Coast…

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1 Comment

  1. Lee
    January 6, 2013 at 13:18 — Reply

    I am completely baffled by what is trying to be said in the last paragraph..

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