UK universities are swiftly losing both students and money as immigration policies now successfully block the number of foreign students coming to study in Britain.

The Office for National Statistics have found that since the Tories came into power in 2010, immigration into the UK has dropped by a third, and the number of international students studying in Britain has dropped by 20%.

For a clinical degree in the UK, international students can pay anywhere between £10,000 and £25,000.

This provides a serious monetary problem for British universities as foreign students invest a large amount of money to fund their degrees.

British and European students studying in Britain must pay a maximum of £9,000 for each academic year. Foreigners wanting to study here, however, are usually expected to pay much more than that; as much as double. For a clinical degree in the UK, international students can pay anywhere between £10,000 and £25,000.

The government now wants to charge all international students from non-European Economic Area countries to use the NHS. Those students who are successfully allowed into the country will then have to pay up for any access to healthcare.

Sonia Chen Zhou, who has come from Spain to study at Nottingham this year told Impact: “it is financially difficult for students as it is; I have problems affording everyday food. Everything is far more expensive in the UK than most other countries, and this is a drawback.”

“I have problems affording everyday food”

With less funding and links to the international academic community, UK universities may lose out on necessary money to grow and develop, as well as finding themselves with weakening connections with institutions throughout the world.

According to the latest global rankings released by the Times Higher Education group, many of Britain’s best universities have dropped down the list, and only one Scottish university is currently in the top 100 institutions in the world.

“The charge for NHS service should be optional for students, since they will have to pay for medical service anyway, and some of them might prefer private medical service”.

Jasmine Chow, International Students’ Officer, told Impact: “These changes might discourage those from less wealthy families to study in the UK, but as long as UK education is attractive, international students will still come here to study. The charge for NHS service should be optional for students, since they will have to pay for medical service anyway, and some of them might prefer private medical service.”

Despite the government’s plans, UK students are showing their support for international students. Over 1000 UK students have signed the NUS petition against unfair NHS charges to show their support for foreigners coming to study in the UK.

Christine Casely

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2 Comments

  1. Yannick Mitchell
    October 29, 2013 at 00:02 — Reply

    Jasmine Chow- “as long as UK education is attractive, international students will come here to study”. Don’t you think having to pay a fortune for using the NHS on top of already ridiculous tuition fees and the high cost of living means UK education is already unattractive?

  2. October 29, 2013 at 08:44 — Reply

    How does the industry neutralise the impact of anti immigration and overpopulation “nativists” whom lobby politicans and influence media?

    As Vince Cable says, to call international students (backpackers, EU citizens etc.) “immigrants” because they fall under the net overseas migration definition (12/16 month rule), but with no plan for permanent immigration, is plainly wrong.

    A start could be to inform media the distinction between NOM and immigration, as opposed to UKIP, Population Matters UK etc. alarming the public about international education, and inflated “immigration” numbers.

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