In support of his well-received second album, Don’t Forget Who You Are, Miles Kane brought his typically British songwriting to Nottingham’s Rock City, with new kids on the block, The Family Rain, in tow.

The Family Rain took to the stage, showing their close-knit family vibes from the off, gathering around Tim’s drums, making jokes and squirting water at each other between songs. The drawn-out reverb helps the crowd to savour the clever guitar riffs of ‘Friction’, with its lethargic rock sound.  ‘Pushing It’, the first track from the EP, quickens the pace with hyperactive instrumentals from insanely talented lead guitarist, Ollie.  This complemented the lingering, sludgy voice of lead singer Will, conjuring sounds of the likes of T. Rex‘s Marc Bolan. Being merely a support, these boys sure looked at home on stage. Take a look at Impact‘s interview with The Family Rain HERE.

Miles Kane struts onto the Rock City stage with Oasis’ ‘Morning Glory’ playing in the background, wearing matching shirt and trousers, both pristinely white, luminous and extremely tight. His guitar held above his head, as though ready to sacrifice it at an altar, the entrance was, needless to say, a tad brave. But, why not? When you’re the leader of a cult that dress like Quadrophenia extras and religiously chant your own lyrics back at you, why not be arrogant? These are your followers, after all.

Perhaps further showing his arrogance, Miles Kane plays eleven songs out of fourteen from that aforementioned new album, Don’t Forget Who You Are. However, the crowd laps all of this up, with their enthusiasm allowing Kane to occasionally stop singing, ensuring that Rock City’s full capacity crowd sing back every single word. Every guitar solo is drowned out by the sound of screams of adoration. It may have been The Beatles that stated “We are more popular than Jesus” but here, Miles Kane is the masses’ chosen divinity.

Having left the stage, his fans protest with the elongated “Whoa, Whoa” of hit single, ‘Come Closer’; the mod-rock song that entered the UK Singles Chart two years ago, until Kane comes back on stage. Before pleasing the crowd, he plays the acoustic ‘Colour Of The Trap’, which, when completely stripped down, shows that Miles Kane’s versatile talent is certainly deserving of his growing cult.

Daisy Foster

…Daisy is listening to – …

Follow Impact Magazine on Facebook and Twitter

Previous post

Interview: The Family Rain

Next post

Album Review: Haim - 'Days Are Gone'

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.