Social science students are more likely to be employed after graduating from university, than science and arts students, according to the latest research from The Campaign for Social Science.

The study has shown that 84% of social science students are in a job three and a half years after graduating, which is 7% more than science, engineering and maths students, and 6% more than arts and humanities students.

The Campaign for Social Science expressed their surprise at this discovery and shared their hope that this would oppose those with the view that social science students add little value to the labour market. Despite the small statistical difference, the Campaign insists that it is “a noticeable one”.

“I studied science because I loved it. If social science isn’t your thing, you’re not going to opt for it”.

The Campaign for Social Science believes that this news will encourage more students to take social sciences, despite the increase in tuition fees two years ago. However some University of Nottingham students disagree, with Physics student Joanne Blunt commenting: “I studied science because I loved it. If social science isn’t your thing, you’re not going to opt for it. I don’t think this news will change much.”

Psychology student Alessandra Fioravanti also believes that the research will not affect student decisions in the future, saying “I don’t think that employment rates would have affected my decision to do the course I’m on anyway. There’s no point in choosing a course simply because it may have better employment opportunities; you may end up in a job you don’t enjoy.”

Employers now have more respect for the skills that social science students acquire through their course.

Dr Sarah Main, director of the Campaign for Science and Engineering expressed surprise at the research, commenting that she doesn’t “really understand the reasons for that turnaround”. She attributed the change to science students choosing to stay on at university to conduct research.

However, Fioravanti considers that employers now have more respect for the skills that social science students acquire through their course, saying that social science students are “quite flexible students in terms of what we do”.

Asha Rahman

Follow Impact News on Twitter and Facebook.

Previous post

Interview: Luke Sital-Singh

Next post

It is the Lecturers Who Didn't Strike Who Deserve a Pay Rise

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published.