HAPPY EASTER, hopefully the Easter Bunny has visited your home this morning. If he has and you need a break from all the chocolate that has been delivered to your door, then read on to find out about Impact’s thoughts on the top five fictional bunnies. (However, if you did not get any Easter eggs, then hopefully you can console your disappointment with this article.)

5) Watership Down

Well, they may not a be a single rabbit, but all the rabbits in Richard Adam’s Watership Down deserve a spot in our top five. Their tale of the survival is far from peaceful or an idyllic countryside setting, incorporating themes of epic heroism and it is often compared with the Epics of Virgil and Homer. If you have neither read it nor even heard of this, go grab a copy of it- or if you’re prepared to brave strange nightmares watch the film.

4) Harvey

Harvey is a play written by Mary Chase in the 1940s. It follows the life of Elwood P. Dowd and his best friend, a six-foot-three-and-a-half rabbit called Harvey. The titular character is a ‘pooka’, a magical creature appropriated from Irish Folklore who are said to befriend social outcasts. Embedded within a comedic script, issues of mental illness and the reactions of those surrounding the sufferers take the forefront in this highly successful play.

3) The White Rabbit

He’s late, he’s late for a very important date… he is also the famous White Rabbit from Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Illustrated in his iconic waistcoat and holding his pocket watch, the White Rabbit is a comforting, albeit mercurial, character in Carroll’s bizarre works.

2) The Velveteen Rabbit

Margery William’s The Velveteen Rabbit is a sentimental story of a toy rabbit who dreams of becoming a real rabbit, through the love of his owner. The narrative involves fairies, talking rabbits and the fickle affections of young children for their toys. If you weren’t read this as a child, think along the lines of Toy Story 3 and get a tissue ready.

1) Rabbit

The rabbit at the top of this list is one who likes to take the lead: A.A. Milne’s Rabbit from Winnie The Pooh. Throughout the gang’s adventures on ‘Hundred- Acre- Wood’ Rabbit is the resident organiser, yet none of his plans are successfully accomplished which is something many University students can probably relate to as exam season looms on the horizon.

Lou Knapp

Image credit: JD Hancock via Flickr

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